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Values, Vision, Voice

The English department operates under the philosophy that every Preston student should be made aware of the human condition and should develop the ability to make positive moral choices through exposure to great literature. In that discovery process, our students are encouraged to listen, think, speak, and write critically about important issues raised by literature.

Preston women will read, write and communicate effectively; think critically; appreciate the aesthetic in literature and non-fiction; and grow as lifelong learners. To achieve those goals, they will participate in small and large group discussions of literature and non-fiction that foster recognition of cultural and ethnic diversity and activate thoughtful empathy. Our students will develop a positive self-concept and manifest personal responsibility through critical reading and writing skills. We enable our students to make connections between literary experiences and issues that touch their personal lives. We seek to motivate our students to read not just for information, but also for enjoyment now and in the future.

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    Michelle Esposito

    Chairperson
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    Stephen Abel

    Teacher
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    Monica Duarte-Carneiro

    Teacher
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    Andrea Forlini

    Teacher
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    Christine Forlini

    Teacher
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    Angela Eckhoff

    Teacher

Preston has partnered with Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture (in Tarrytown, NY), to provide a Food Education course that teaches students how to source, prepare, and cook healthy, sustainable meals. The course also explores the history behind the American food system, as the class explores ancient agricultural practices, modern industrial methods, and even current, more mindful aspects of the slow food movement. So far, students have already visited Stone Barns to farm and cook; within Preston itself, the class has also made macaroni and cheese (a conventional and vegan version), fresh (home-made) pasta, stew, and Tlayudas—all to punctuate ideas related to food and culture, history, and power.

Dance Marathon!